Newton Ma best place to live

Wikipedia on Newton, Massachusetts

Newton Ma best place to live

Newton has a Wikipedia page! I guess this is useful for anyone thinking of moving to Newton and right now the real estate in Newton, MA is a hot market.

Villages

Newton is a suburban city approximately seven miles from downtown Boston. Rather than having a single city center, Newton is a patchwork of thirteen “villages”, many boasting small “downtown” areas of their own. The 13 villages are:AuburndaleChestnut HillNewton CentreNewton CornerNewton HighlandsNewton Lower FallsNewton Upper Falls (both on the Charles River, and both once small industrial sites), NewtonvilleNonantum (also called “The Lake”), Oak Hill,ThompsonvilleWaban and West NewtonOak Hill Park is a place within the village of Oak Hill that itself is shown as a separate and distinct village on some city maps, (including a map dated 2010 on the official City of Newton website) and Four Corners is also shown as a village on some city maps. Although most of the villages have a post office, they have no legal definition and no firmly defined borders. This village-based system often causes some confusion with addresses and for first time visitors.

History

Newton was settled in 1630 as part of “the newe towne”, which was renamed Cambridge in 1638. It was incorporated as a separate town, known as Cambridge Village, in 1688, then renamed Newtown in 1691, and finally Newton in 1766.[3] It became a city in 1873. Newton is known as The Garden City.

In Reflections in Bullough’s Pond, Newton historian Diana Muir describes the early industries that developed in the late 18th and early 19th centuries in a series of mills built to take advantage of the water power available at Newton Upper Fallsand Newton Lower Falls. Snuff, chocolate, glue, paper and other products were produced in these small mills but, according to Muir, the water power available in Newton was not sufficient to turn Newton into a manufacturing city.

Newton, according to Muir, became one of America’s earliest commuter suburbs. The Boston and Worcester, one of America’s earliest railroads, reached West Newton in 1834. Gracious homes sprang up almost instantly on erstwhile farmland on West Newton hill, as men wealthy enough to afford a country seat, but whose business demanded that they be in their downtown Boston offices during the business day, took advantage of the new commuting opportunity offered by the railroad. Muir points out that these early commuters needed sufficient wealth to employ a groom and keep horses, to drive them from their hilltop homes to the station.

Further suburbanization came in waves. One wave began with the streetcar lines that made many parts of Newton accessible for commuters in the late nineteenth century, the next wave came in the 1920s when automobiles became affordable to a growing upper middle class. Even then, however, Oak Hill continued to be farmed, mostly market gardening, until the prosperity of the 1950s made all of Newton more densely settled. Newton is not a typical “commuter suburb” since many people who live in Newton do not work in downtown Boston. Most Newtonites work in Newton and other surrounding cities and towns.

The city has two symphony orchestras, the New Philharmonia Orchestra of Massachusetts and the Newton Symphony Orchestra.

The Newton Free Library possesses more than 500,000 volumes of print materials (2004), as well as art, both original and prints, sound recordings and videos: the largest collection in the Minuteman Library Network.[citation needed]

Each April on Patriots Day, the Boston Marathon is run through the city, entering from Wellesley on Route 16 (Washington Street) where runners encounter the first of the four infamous Newton Hills. It then turns right onto Route 30 (Commonwealth Avenue) for the long haul into Boston. There are two more hills before reaching Centre Street, and then the fourth and most infamous of all, Heartbreak Hill, rises shortly after Centre Street. Residents and visitors line the race route along Washington Street and Commonwealth Avenue to cheer the runners.

Here’s an except of our schools:

Preschools

This list was not comprehensive so we did another post here that has pretty much every preschool we’ve ever heard of in Newton, MA.

[edit]Primary and secondary education

Public: Newton Public Schools

Public Elementary Schools include:

  • Angier
  • Bowen
  • Burr
  • Cabot School
  • Countryside
  • Franklin
  • Horace Mann
  • Lincoln Eliot
  • Mason Rice
  • Memorial Spaulding
  • Peirce
  • Underwood
  • Ward
  • Williams
  • Zervas

Newton has four public middle schools:

  • Bigelow
  • Brown
  • Oak Hill
  • Day

Brown Middle School and Oak Hill Middle School graduates go on to Newton South while Frank A. Day Middle School and Bigelow Middle School graduates go on to Newton North. There are exceptions based on exact location of the student’s home.

Newton has two public high schools:

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